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Thursday, May 17, 2007

I, Spy More


Yesterday, everyone was talking about the testimony of former Deputy Attorney General James Comey. As Creature noted, some disturbing new questions have been raised, chief among them why Congress has not sought further investigations of the NSA spying scandal especially in light of what has just been learned.

Well Congress is finally sitting up and taking notice. In a letter sent to Gonzales late yesterday, Senators questioned the Attorney General as to whether he will continue to stand by his testimony last February that there was no dispute in the Department of Justice over the legality of the NSA wiretapping program. As Comey testified on Tuesday, he and several senior administration officials, including then AG Ashcroft, came close to resigning in protest because the Bush administration insisted upon continuing the wiretapping program despite objections from the DOJ.

Now Gonzales has responded saying that he does indeed stand by his earlier testimony. This is where the story starts to get interesting. During that testimony, Gonzales took pains to stress that he could only discuss the surveillance program that had already been revealed by the New York Times and later confirmed by the Bush administration. What Comey revealed now raises the question of whether there are more spying programs which have yet to be disclosed and Laura Rosen adds some pieces to the puzzle that may suggest that the FBI may have been involved in such surveillance.

This is definitely something that Congress needs to look into with all deliberate speed so we may finally learn just who was spied on. Because given the nature of the beast behind Purgegate, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to speculate who that may be.

Update: Marty Lederman speculates on the nature of "the program".

Update II: The Anonymous Liberal has some thoughts on why Comey may have sought help from FBI Director Mueller.

(Plucked from a folder at The Xsociate Files)